Cambridge Hard Autumn Tournament–2018

For more information about the tournament, please see the Facebook event.

UK Quizbowl and Cambridge University Quiz Society are pleased to announce this year’s edition of the Cambridge Hard Autumn Tournament (CHAT), formerly known as Penn Bowl, taking place on the 27th October at Cripps Court of Magdalene College, Cambridge. We are expecting a field cap of eight teams, though this may be increased to ten if there is sufficient interest.

This tournament is ‘semi-open’, in that student teams have priority to enter, but open teams are also likely to be taking part. Registration will be accepted from 18:00 on Friday 5th, through sending a registration email with a team name and a primary contact to th497@cam.ac.uk.

The cost of the event is £60 per team, with a £5 discount each for:

  • bringing buzzers;

  • bringing a moderator;

  • the whole team travelling further than 200 miles to get to Cambridge.

This tournament is officially around ‘regular’ difficulty, but in practice is likely to be at the hard end of this — in particular, it will not be Briticised. It will be considerably harder than OAT or WNT, and will probably be the hardest tournament of the term save possibly for EAT. An example question is included below:

This author claimed that recent novelists had “shown us what it is that we certainly could not do, but as certainly, perhaps, do not wish to do” in “Modern Novels.” This author claimed that human character changed “on or about December 1910” in an essay about “Mrs. Brown” that attacks author Arnold Bennett. One of this author’s books ends with a mother asking “What am I to do with these?” while holding her (*) dead son’s shoes. This author wrote about Paul searching for Minta’s brooch on the beach in a novel where a little boy carefully cuts shapes out of a magazine while thinking about how much he hates his father, a “tyrannical” intellectual based on this author’s father, the academic Leonard Stephen. For 10 points, name this author who created the painter Lily Briscoe in an “elegy” written to exorcise the memories of her parents, To the Lighthouse.

ANSWER: Virginia Woolf

The full set of packets from last year is available online here.